Social Capital and Depressive Episodes: Gender Differences in the ELSA-Brasil Cohort.

Bibliographic Details
Title: Social Capital and Depressive Episodes: Gender Differences in the ELSA-Brasil Cohort.
Authors: Souto EP; Department of Epidemiology and Quantitative Methods in Health, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil., Moreno AB; Department of Epidemiology and Quantitative Methods in Health, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil., Chor D; Department of Epidemiology and Quantitative Methods in Health, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil., Melo ECP; Department of Epidemiology and Quantitative Methods in Health, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil., Barreto SM; Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil., Nunes MA; Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil., Griep RH; Laboratory of Health and Environment Education, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Source: Frontiers in public health [Front Public Health] 2021 May 17; Vol. 9, pp. 657700. Date of Electronic Publication: 2021 May 17 (Print Publication: 2021).
Publication Type: Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language: English
Journal Info: Publisher: Frontiers Editorial Office Country of Publication: Switzerland NLM ID: 101616579 Publication Model: eCollection Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 2296-2565 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 22962565 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Front Public Health Subsets: Health Administration; MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s): Original Publication: Lausanne : Frontiers Editorial Office
MeSH Terms: Social Capital*, Adult ; Brazil ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Longitudinal Studies ; Male ; Sex Characteristics
Abstract: Introduction: The association between social capital and depression is a frequent research topic in developed countries, often with inconclusive results. Furthermore, for both social capital and depression, there are gender differences established in the literature. This study investigates gender differences in the association of social capital with the incidence and maintenance of depressive episodes. Methods: Baseline and second wave data (4 years of follow-up) from the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a multicenter cohort of civil servants with 15,105 workers aged 35-74 years, were used. Social capital was assessed using the Resource Generator, a scale composed of two different dimensions: "social support" and "prestige and education." Depressive episodes were assessed using the Clinical Interview Schedule - Revised (CIS-R). The statistical analysis was performed using multinomial regression with adjustments for possible confounding factors. Results: Among men, low social capital in the "social support" dimension was associated with the incidence of depressive episodes (RR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.01-2.72). Among women, social support was associated with the maintenance of depressive episodes (RR = 2.66; 95% CI: 1.61-4.41). Social capital was not associated with the incidence or maintenance of depressive episodes in the "prestige and education" dimension in both genders. Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of the dimension "social support" in both genders in its association with mental health. The resource-based social capital approach proved to be adequate for investigating mental health and confirms the idea that social networks can be useful in the treatment and prevention of depressive episodes.
(Copyright © 2021 Souto, Moreno, Chor, Melo, Barreto, Nunes and Griep.)
References: Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(5):418-29. (PMID: 25155221)
Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Feb;44(1):68-75. (PMID: 24585730)
Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jan;64(1):5-20. (PMID: 17045716)
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;56(6):593-605. (PMID: 19734179)
Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(6):771-9. (PMID: 22486561)
Clin Psychol Rev. 2007 Dec;27(8):959-85. (PMID: 17448579)
Soc Sci Med. 2007 Aug;65(3):481-92. (PMID: 17462805)
PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24732. (PMID: 21931836)
J Health Soc Behav. 2009 Jun;50(2):149-63. (PMID: 19537457)
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Jun;71(6):606-612. (PMID: 28235820)
PLoS Med. 2006 Nov;3(11):e442. (PMID: 17132052)
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):145-61. (PMID: 21673143)
Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(4):462-71. (PMID: 22300005)
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;52(12):1223-38. (PMID: 21954964)
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Mar;54(5):783-98. (PMID: 11999493)
Singapore Med J. 2007 May;48(5):385-91. (PMID: 17453094)
Aging Ment Health. 2011 Aug;15(6):765-74. (PMID: 21838514)
Cad Saude Publica. 2016 Jul 21;32(7):. (PMID: 27462850)
J Health Soc Behav. 2008 Mar;49(1):104-18. (PMID: 18418988)
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Aug;59(8):619-27. (PMID: 16020636)
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2013 Dec;37(10 Pt 1):2375-97. (PMID: 23886513)
Glob Health Action. 2011 Feb 08;4:5611. (PMID: 21311607)
Soc Sci Med. 2016 Aug;163:135-43. (PMID: 27423294)
Rev Saude Publica. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 2:131-9. (PMID: 24346730)
Soc Sci Med. 2013 May;85:32-7. (PMID: 23540363)
J Urban Health. 2001 Sep;78(3):458-67. (PMID: 11564849)
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Dec;52(4):478-92. (PMID: 22021655)
Electron Physician. 2017 Sep 25;9(9):5212-5222. (PMID: 29038699)
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Apr;21(4):354-361. (PMID: 26404493)
Contributed Indexing: Keywords: Brazil*; cohort studies*; depression*; gender difference*; multinomial regression*; social capital*
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 20210603 Date Completed: 20210616 Latest Revision: 20210616
Update Code: 20210623
PubMed Central ID: PMC8165187
DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2021.657700
PMID: 34079785
Published: 2021 May 17
Database: MEDLINE

Academic Journal