The evolution of the association between community level social capital and COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations in the United States.

Bibliographic Details
Title: The evolution of the association between community level social capital and COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations in the United States.
Authors: Borgonovi F; Social Research Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: f.borgonovi@ucl.ac.uk., Andrieu E; Economics Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: elodie.andrieu@kcl.ac.uk., Subramanian SV; Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Cambridge MA, USA; Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston MA, USA. Electronic address: svsubram@hsph.harvard.edu.
Source: Social science & medicine (1982) [Soc Sci Med] 2021 Jun; Vol. 278, pp. 113948. Date of Electronic Publication: 2021 Apr 20.
Publication Type: Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language: English
Journal Info: Publisher: Pergamon Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 8303205 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1873-5347 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 02779536 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Soc Sci Med Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s): Original Publication: Oxford ; New York : Pergamon, c1982-
MeSH Terms: COVID-19* , Social Capital*, Hospitalization ; Humans ; SARS-CoV-2 ; United States/epidemiology
Abstract: We use county level data from the United States to document the role of social capital the evolution of COVID-19 between January 2020 and January 2021. We find that social capital differentials in COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations depend on the dimension of social capital and the timeframe considered. Communities with higher levels of relational and cognitive social capital were especially successful in lowering COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations than communities with lower social capital between late March and early April. A difference of one standard deviation in relational social capital corresponded to a reduction of 30% in the number of COVID-19 deaths recorded. After April 2020, differentials in COVID-19 deaths related to relational social capital persisted although they became progressively less pronounced. By contrast, the period of March-April 2020, our estimates suggest that there was no statistically significant difference in the number of deaths recorded in areas with different levels of cognitive social capital. In fact, from late June-early July onwards the number of new deaths recorded as being due to COVID-19 was higher in communities with higher levels of cognitive social capital. The overall number of deaths recorded between January 2020 and January 2021 was lower in communities with higher levels of relational social capital. Our findings suggest that the association between social capital and public health outcomes can vary greatly over time and across indicators of social capital.
(Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier Ltd.)
Contributed Indexing: Keywords: COVID-19*; Deaths*; Social capital*; Social determinants of health*; United States*
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 20210430 Date Completed: 20210521 Latest Revision: 20210521
Update Code: 20210623
PubMed Central ID: PMC8055504
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2021.113948
PMID: 33930677
Published: 2021 Jun
Database: MEDLINE

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