Commercial luncheon meat products and their in vitro gastrointestinal digests contain more protein carbonyl compounds but less lipid oxidation products compared to fresh pork.

Bibliographic Details
Title: Commercial luncheon meat products and their in vitro gastrointestinal digests contain more protein carbonyl compounds but less lipid oxidation products compared to fresh pork.
Authors: Goethals S; Laboratory for Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Department of Animal Sciences and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium; Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium. Electronic address: sophiea.goethals@ugent.be., Van Hecke T; Laboratory for Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Department of Animal Sciences and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: thomas.vanhecke@ugent.be., Vossen E; Laboratory for Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Department of Animal Sciences and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: els.vossen@ugent.be., Vanhaecke L; Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium; Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. Electronic address: lynn.vanhaecke@ugent.be., Van Camp J; Research Group Food Chemistry and Human Nutrition, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: john.vancamp@ugent.be., De Smet S; Laboratory for Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Department of Animal Sciences and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: stefaan.desmet@ugent.be.
Source: Food research international (Ottawa, Ont.) [Food Res Int] 2020 Oct; Vol. 136, pp. 109585. Date of Electronic Publication: 2020 Jul 30.
Publication Type: Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language: English
Journal Info: Publisher: Published on behalf of the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology by Elsevier Applied Science Country of Publication: Canada NLM ID: 9210143 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1873-7145 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 09639969 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Food Res Int Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s): Original Publication: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada : Published on behalf of the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology by Elsevier Applied Science, c1992-
MeSH Terms: Meat Products*/analysis , Pork Meat* , Red Meat*/analysis, Animals ; Gastrointestinal Tract ; Humans ; Lipids ; Meat/analysis ; Protein Carbonylation ; Swine
Abstract: Because of the large diversity in processed meat products and the potential involvement of oxidation processes in the association between red and processed meat consumption and chronic diseases, the concentration of oxidation products after gastrointestinal digestion of commercial luncheon meat products was investigated. A broad spectrum of meat products (n = 24), displaying large variation in macro- and micronutrient composition and processing procedures, was digested in vitro by simulating digestion fluids of the human gastrointestinal tract. Lipid and protein oxidation was assessed in the meat products before digestion and in the corresponding digests by measurement of free malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, hexanal and protein carbonyl compounds. Compared to an unprocessed cooked pork mince, that was included as a reference in the digestion experiment, levels of lipid oxidation products were low in the digests of most meat products. Only the digests of Parma ham had slightly higher or comparable levels as the reference pork. In contrast, protein carbonyl compounds were comparable or up to 6 times higher in the processed meat products compared to the reference pork. Particularly raw-cooked and precooked-cooked meat products and corresponding digests had higher protein carbonyl levels, but also lower protein contents and higher fat to protein ratios. In conclusion, most luncheon meat products and corresponding digests contained lower amounts of free lipid oxidation products, but more protein carbonyl compounds compared to the reference pork.
(Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.)
Contributed Indexing: Keywords: 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal*; In vitro digestion*; Lipid oxidation*; Luncheon meats*; Malondialdehyde*; Processed meat*; Protein carbonyl compounds*; Protein oxidation*
Substance Nomenclature: 0 (Lipids)
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 20200828 Date Completed: 20210514 Latest Revision: 20210514
Update Code: 20210914
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodres.2020.109585
PMID: 32846614
Published: 2020 Oct
Database: MEDLINE

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