Benchmarking forensic rulers and photographic techniques.

Bibliographic Details
Title: Benchmarking forensic rulers and photographic techniques.
Authors: Barns J; International Research Collaborative, Oral Health and Equity, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Western Australia, Australia., Kruger E; International Research Collaborative, Oral Health and Equity, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address: estie.kruger@uwa.edu.au., Tennant M; International Research Collaborative, Oral Health and Equity, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Western Australia, Australia.
Source: Journal of forensic and legal medicine [J Forensic Leg Med] 2016 Jul; Vol. 41, pp. 5-9. Date of Electronic Publication: 2016 Apr 09.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Publisher: Elsevier Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 101300022 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1878-7487 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 1752928X NLM ISO Abbreviation: J Forensic Leg Med Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s): Original Publication: Kidlington, Oxford : Elsevier
MeSH Terms: Forensic Sciences/*standards , Photography/*methods , Weights and Measures/*instrumentation, Forensic Sciences/instrumentation ; Humans ; Photography/instrumentation ; Reproducibility of Results ; Temperature
Abstract: Measuring various items (evidence) at the scene of an investigation, exposed to the elements, is an instrumental part of systematic forensic science. The key to these measurements often rest on rulers, and a knowledge of their limitations is vital to their appropriate application. The aim of this study was to test forensic ruler accuracy and photographic distortion under conditions that simulate common use to provide a foundational basis for baseline accuracy of their use. A series of ABFO rulers from 2 anonymous manufactures were tested against gold standards for accuracy at various temperatures (-14, 0, 25 and 40 °C). At the same time a series of rulers were photographed at different angulations to test reproducibility and angular distortion. At room temperature a variation of 0.28% in the dimensions of the rulers were found with larger distortions at colder temperatures. Photographs taken with the camera above the rulers suffered the least distortion (approximately 6-10°) and there was no difference over time, nor with ruler background colour. The results from this study show that further investigation is required into preventing angular distortion, and show the need for increased training to those who would be in a situation requiring them to document the scene of a crime.
(Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.)
Contributed Indexing: Keywords: Benchmark; Forensic science; Photography
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 20160425 Date Completed: 20170306 Latest Revision: 20170817
Update Code: 20210623
DOI: 10.1016/j.jflm.2016.04.004
PMID: 27107561
Published: 2016 Jul
Database: MEDLINE

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